Can we re-build Ziarat residency and Pakistan?


Can we re-build Ziarat residency and Pakistan?

Not that we haven’t seen Jinnah’s home, Pakistan, brought to tatters by terrorism and other vices, it still hurts even more to see how anti-Pakistan forces cant even tolerate to let an object of symbolic and sentimental attachment with our founder stand intact.

 

This morning when Jinnah’s Ziarat residence, where he spent his last days, was reduced to rubble by shells, we received a clear message. A clear message and lucid message that they want each and every nook and cranny of our land destroyed, of the hatred they nurse in their hearts for our beloved Quaid, and that they would kill to see Jinnah’s Pakistan go down to ashes just like they did to the few last of Jinnah’s relics.

 

The ethereally beautiful Ziarat residence, its whitewashed walls exuding all the purity and mountain clad beauty reflected by its surrounding locale . It remained home to Jinnah when he was ailing from TB. It was a striking reminder of the sacrifices of a man who gave up his life, his home and everything that could possibly be so Pakistan could come into being and thrive, spent his last day there- not in some foreign hospital receiving the best and most expensive of the treatments. But in Ziarat valley, so his disease would not become a burden on the newly born state and he could live a little longer with peace.

 

What happened was worse though. It still runs chills through the spines thinking his last tragic day at Karachi, when he had to spend hours in a broken ambulance waiting for another to come, in scorching heat of the marshes of Karachi. And Fatima Jinnah attending to him and the impatiently running off after every few minutes to see if the ambulance had arrived. Next day, he left us orphaned and grief-stricken. And ever since then, our nation has been waiting for the next shepherd to guide us out of the pitch dark we dwell in for decades now.

 

For those who were unsure that there are anti-Pakistan forces more actively at work than ever, today’s attack at Ziarat residency is a reality check. A stark reminder to the extent of their abhorrence towards our country, our founder’s ideals and us. There are some who are enthusiastically speaking of rebuilding Ziarat residency more beautiful than was, my question is, what about Jinnah’s real progeny- Pakistan. How much are we willing to sacrifice to build it up and strengthen it, for this is where these terrorists have actually challenged us.



Madeeha Ishtiaque

The content writer & person-in-charge of the The News/Geo International Blog. She monitors the social media activity on The News. Follow her on twitter @charmed0000


  • NASAH (USA)

    The traitors have struck at the very foundation of Pakistan — and Pakistanis are talking about ‘rebuilding’ a lost National Treasure? — NOT going after the ENEMY!

    This is the ambivalence that is killing Pakistan.

    • M.Saeed

      Now, for a change, NASAH Sb., can you suggest any solution to get rid of these terror-monsters getting many limbs grown out of every single severed limb?

  • faisal

    it hurts me even though i am an oversees it a mouring for us

  • Ehtesham Arshad Nezami

    You can build or rebuild any building, but you cannot build a country which is being destroyed by its own people.

    • Anonymous

      Dear Mr. Nizami,
      I appluade your wise quote of “You cannot build a country which is being destroyed by its own people”. To correct it over a period of time,
      I would suggest, you collect a group of Mullahs, Moulavis or Imams and request them to preach to the public to practise “Good Thoughts, Good Words and Good Deeds” those are the basic requirements of any decent society. It will not cost money, just time, perseverance and patience.
      But surely, this will not provide them with food, clothing and shelter, therefore in the interim period continue with their modest means.
      Teach them to respect each other and be tolerant to the views of others.
      Be kind to animals and look after the environment, and check pollution to maintain good health. It is important to look within one’s self, rather than shouting and blaming, the Americans, British, Israelis and the West in general.
      I must confess, I am not a preacher nor a nut case to present this article to you, time alone will tell.
      I am glad to note there are thinking people like you still living in our country. Keep up the good work.
      Sorry to have bored you.
      Kind regards,
      Hormuzd

  • Nadeem

    Ziarat Residency was one of the places on my to visit list. I regret its no more as it was. We should rebuild it and go after the people responsible for this. But are we any better than the perpetrators when he have allowed Jinnah’s Pakistan to sink into this abyss of corruption, lawlessness and violence and not tried to bring it up.

  • Anonymous

    Trouble with all the people of this sub-continent is the ease ith which they pass the buck and rationalise it with a selective take on history. You forget the role of Messers Patel and Nehru in pushing Mr Jinnah to the point where an truer Indian Nationalist is left with little option. I guess you will call Nr Jaswant Singh a traitor too for being honest about facts.

    In any case why Mr Jinnah, a secular and NON-PROVINCIAL (hus strongest weakness!) leader in all aspects, gathered the support of Muslim majority, is more relevant – what made the muslims of India feel so insecure that they followed Mr Jinnah, who in his person was not one to let emotion of hate cloud his reason. Perhaps that is what his detractors find irritating – even today.

    Regardless of the position in Kashmir today, how would you justify what the ruler and Mr Nehru did back then?

    Regardless of the rights and wrongs of 60 plus years, the reality is that partition became a fact in 1947 (and then in 1971). You may have an opinion about these but the venomous intent on this ocassion with its sentimental value for a country, provides little justification for your queries and is crass.

    Remember hate, whether today or 65 years ago, is a reaction – if you figure out what it was a reaction to, you will get your answers.

  • Anonymous

    NASAH Sb

    There is more at play here than just TTP.

    • M.Saeed

      “—Remember the US is engaged in talks with the Taliban in Afghanistan.” And also droning so called Pak Taliban!

      • Anonymous

        Obviously not fast enough for the menace to be rid. Perhaps the solution is Pakistani government taking over the drone program – would certainly remove the legal ambiguities and negativity of the nation currently aimed at the US.

  • Anonymous

    Hashmi Sb

    It is not becoming to try the blame game on this ocassion. These are difficult times for all.

  • Anonymous

    But Most Pakistanis DON’T support these terrorist.

  • M.Saeed

    Hashmi sb. have heart! Give them handicap-time before starting-up. Besides, BLA and Lashkar e Jhangvi have already accepted responsibilities of the two incidents, Ziarat and female University students respectively.

  • M.Saeed

    We should learn from the US experience and have our own Drones, specific to attack all anti-state actors without any reservations. It is no any nuclear technology and can be developed almost in no time with a genuine resolve. We must act on it as a foremost national priority of self-defence against enemies of the state.

  • Anonymous

    Army should carpet bomb those who did this ! I think the line is crossed.. punjabis in baluchistan should also pick weapons just like muhaajirs did in Karachi ..

  • Anonymous

    Hashmi Sb

    1. Should responsible persons start making unfounded declarations before all the facts are in?
    2. Saeed Sb has already stated the parties declaring responsibility.
    3. Other countries also claim terrorism on their grounds has Pakistani involvement – so fanning the argument is counter productive.
    4. Do you make a distinction between the Afghan Taliban and tge TTP?
    5. Condemnation of any abhorent act by any party or leader is not sufficient – it needs to be followed with action to deal with the problem in a manner that it does not repeat. Wait and see what NS does to deal with it in the coming weeks (not years) before judging.

    • Farooq Hashmi

      Alright Mr.Qalim. Let’s wait and watch that the blurred spot of Mr. Nisar Ali khan’s resolve to crush terrorism takes a definite shape. In a few days his actions will speak for themselves.
      Scorpions’ nature is the same. It’s immaterial that they are in Pakistan or in Afghanistan.The Afghan Taliban butchered the Afghan people as the TTP did the people of Swat

      • Anonymous

        Hashmi Sb

        Lets start worrying about scorpions at home instead of perceived scorpion abroad – Without entering into tge legalities of it, even the US (let alone Pakistan) finds difficulty in policing the world!

  • Anonymous

    NASAH Sb

    He is yet to put his foot in his mouth after assuming office so an unfair comparison for now.

  • Anonymous

    NASAH Sb

    1. In order to deal with it, a correct reference to thePakistani problem is needed – namely TTP. A distinction was always made between Al Qaeda snd Taliban (which were Afghans), and confusing/merging TTP with Afghan Taliban will not yield an solution.
    2. Hopefully, the Pakistani government will follow up on your suggestion. Perhaps this may happen towards the year end once the ‘democrat’ with the gun vacates his current seat for a new one (but within the current legitimate setup).

  • Farooq Hashmi

    The mouths of the big international powers and some of Pakistan’s neighboring countries are watering at the rich natural deposits of Balochistan. Thus, in complicity with the internal enemies of Pakistan, they are inching towards the balkanization of Balochistan, with a cheetah’s cunningness, and surely Pakistan is an atomic power. Pakistan needs to get out of its slumber and cast its foreign policy into a new mold.

    • M.Saeed

      Hashmi Sb, Bucha Bughal maaiN dhandorah shehr maiN!

      The year was 1975 and a free-lance self-employed Pakistani geologist working on the historic references, had discovered a Gold-mine he
      called Bonanza, somewhere in the northern area mountains.

      He went with his voluminous reports to the then PM Bhutto, who directed him to submit his reports to PMDC. As the usual, the person was asked to disclose the location of the goldmines first, that he refused without
      having his share assured. Therefore, as normal practice in such cases where personal interests defeat the national, the man was declared a”Pagal” and told to get lost. Unfortunate man died soon after due to apathy of all who mattered and his work is nowhere to be seen again since then.

  • M.Saeed

    Itne manous sayad say ho gaye ab rihaee mile bhi tou mar
    jayeN gay.

    Even all ruffians are not equal. Let him prove himself before showering/wasting your pearls on him.

  • Anonymous

    You use a derogatory term like “Pakis.. “. And you wonder why the hate and TNT flourished!

    My friend, back then it was worse – as for Kashmir, think about why so many Muslim Kashmiris used to head to the plains of Punjab in the late 19th early 20th century instead of arguing about flaws in Partition. If partition was flawed then the way Kashmir was dealt with at the time was highly flawed. Think about Hyderabad too…..as NASAH Sb points out, nakedness in that hammam of partition is not exclusive!

  • M.Saeed

    Hashmi Sb, during those old days, there were a handful of traitors like Ehahi Buksh, Jafar and Sadiq but we now have a swarm of them around to the extent, the real loving sons of the unfortunate motherland are left just a handful few and even most of them are living down-in-mouth in borrowed lands abroad.

    “Jaffar az Bengal,Sadiq az Deccan; nang-e-deen, nang-e-millat, nang-e-watan”

    But the incident of the Goldmine I had mentioned is a hard fact and remains a horrible scar on the face of bureaucratic apathy. I have written several letters and comments even on these pages but of no effect.

  • Anonymous

    An educated man that you are, surely you will find out the origins of the terms like ‘Paki’ and ‘Nigger’.

    Merits (or not) of the Two Nation Theory apart, ground reality is the existance of Pakistan today. Your selective history reading may benefit from a visit to Christopher Beaumont’s papers about the mess causing elements at partition. Link below for a short intro:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/1394313/His-Honour-Christopher-Beaumont.html

    Your omission of the word ‘some’ before quoting Yaqoob Bangash’s reference to ‘Muslims of India’, is a sly attempt to malign. Think again why Iqbal (by no means a zealot wahabi whilst Mr Gandhi still supported the Khilafat movement) declaring ‘sare jahan se acha Hindustan hamara’ , starts to think about muslim autonomy region – albeit within a United India and a secular Mr Jinnah (the truer Indian Nationalist by Mr JaswantSingh’s anlysis) starts to consider an independent state post 1937.

    As for Kashmir, I suggest you ponder over why India went for UN’s Chapter VI (non- binding) and not the binding Chapter VII. From a Kashmiri’s point of view, the tussle and fighting over Kashmir between India and Pakistan, without either party ever truly including or considering the whole Kashmiri peoples’ wishes, has been and disenfranches Kashmiris – first the Maharaja now Pakistan and India.

  • Anonymous

    I trust your intent is not to point score as mine is dialectical. The saddest tragedy for Pakistan as a nation was that Mr Jinnah did not survive for a few more years beyond the year after partition. If he had, Pakistan today would have been a WHOLE lot different in a very positive sense. Mr Nehru survived for nearly 17 years and left his mark on India.

    You may find the following of interest:

    http://pakteahouse.net/2010/11/19/was-jinnah-a-democrat/

    http://pakteahouse.net/2013/01/13/jinnah-v-nehru-who-was-more-democratic/

  • Anonymous

    I assume you are yet to find a logical argument against the points YLH raises. Perhaps Jaswant Singh is a Jinnah hagiographer too!

  • Anonymous

    ….well perhaps The Congress should then have negotiated The League’s 14 points presented by Mr Jinnah in 1929. There was allways the possibility to revisit these once a stable independent India was in place instead of Mr Nehru ridiculing them.

  • M.Saeed

    Hashmi Sb, you are theoretically correct!
    Having met the person mentioned above, I still remember some information about the “suspected gold-mine”. I don’t want to be taken as another lunatic but would like the matter to be dealt with in trust and transparency against shabby deals like Reko Diq in Baluchistan.

    I do not have any personal interest except the paramount interest of the country to benefit from its resources.

    Besides, I also know about some “real unsung heroes” who made the the nuclear dream possible. They said, they did their job for which they were employed and were being paid their salaries and not for any personal praise or reasons. There were and still are many of them. It was/is a whole team work.

  • Anonymous

    I’m content to accept in general Mr Singh’s analysis. You don’t address the question what led Mr Jinnah to change his position in the late 1930s, and Mr Singh does. Your only retort is that YLH is a hagiographer and rather flawed and inaccurate conclusion that Prof Ishtiaq has comprehensively beaten YLH’s argument.

    Surprises me that you and Prof Ishtiaq would rather put your faith in a hereditary self styled religious wadera and his political utterings instead of secular logic of either Mr Jinnah or YLH.

    The peoples of India and Pakistan are of the SAME soil and do act in similar manners to. With that in mind, and that had not been for Mr Jinnah, India would be faced with the type of mess Pakistan as today, thanks to all those nuts exploiting religion. Unfortunately Mr Jinnah, whilst he may have been able to handle the Congress politicians, underestimated the cunning of the religion mafia. Surely you would have preffered Mr Jinnah’s Pakistan to the one it ended up being. Even Prof Ishtiaq would not disagree with that!

    .

  • Anonymous

    Again my friend, if it helps you to deal with the matter by blaming and holding Mr Jinnah responsible for partition, I’m content to accept it. You don’t have to clutch to straws by extracting meaning from political/party statements and overlooking the man himself. The question still remains what vrought the changes in Mr Jinnah’s stance – remembering it takes two to tango.

    Just digressing, what is it about Gujarat soil that it has produced during the last century, personalities which have had and continue have great influence over the affairs (political and economic) of the whole sub-continent?

    …and to conclude our discussion on this forum, a nother YLH reference. Hopefully, you will have te grace to appreciate and have respect Mr Jinnah as a man of honour, as Mr Jaswant Singh does, regardless of whether you or Mr Singh ultimately hold him responsible for the partition
    .
    http://www.thenews.com.pk/TodaysPrintDetail.aspx?ID=199659&Cat=9&dt=9/24/2009

  • M.Saeed

    Dear ss, time tickles and life goes on. Even majority of Indians do not believe in their own historic events in ancient history, not to talk of Jinnah and others of these times. For example, sensible Hindus agree that, Ram Janamabhoomi could not be there at Ayodhya in 1528 AD because, having lived over 7000 earlier than Shahanshah Babar, his Janamabhoomi would be lying 28 feet below ground in 1528, unknown to all. It is a simple geological fact that Indian rivers flood and deposit silt into the plains at an average rate of 4 feet every 1000 years.